Pillbox Nian

Hello!

I’m really not sure if I can do a post today! The internet is being a nuisance and has been turning on/off ever since I opened my laptop and started to blog today.

 

Oh wait, it’s back! Phew!

Finally I can load the shop.

ARGH it’s gone again!

Luckily, I have inserted all the images here-!

 

Monday Rare Item


 

Actually… Rare Item Monday (RIM) but… oh well.

Today’s RIM can be found in the Jam Mart Clothing store. We have a Pillbox Hat!

screen-shot-2017-01-23-at-10-39-48-pm

The non-rare item itself has been cleared from the store some time back, and this isn’t one of my favourite items.

Here’s Countess with the hat on:

screen-shot-2017-01-23-at-10-40-55-pm

She doesn’t really look the best in it…

Especially that blue isn’t on her colour scheme-

 

 

Miscellaneous


In the New Year’s Fortune adventure, you can find these two.

Wei and Lei speak of the Nian, a monster that scares people of the villages. As what they have mentioned is true, and has led to the beginning of Chinese new year.

The monster, Nian, comes to a village and scares them away (eating people too, I think?). People grew fearful of the creature and often shun away. Fortunately, a man came and observed that the Nian was frightened by the colour red, and thus on Chinese new year, people wear red to scare the demon, and the crackers that made loud noises also ensured their distance.

However, some other legends also speak Nian as a good figure, as one who brought Chinese new year as their intention.

Once there was a village which was filled with fear. The Nian looked at it, and decided to assist them. The Nian provided them the fire crackers, in the colour of red, and soon the people of the village celebrate together happiness brought by the fire crackers.

These are the two sides of the story. Personally, I know the story with the Nian’s bad side more than the one with the good side, so it’s up to you to decide!

Fun fact: ‘Wei’ means ‘micro’ and ‘lei’ means tired. However, if you attach ‘xiao’ (smile) to ‘wei’, it becomes ‘wei xiao (smile)’. Their expressions on their masks seem to be opposites to their names.


 

One small question to you all!

Do you celebrate Chinese new year? Is it in your tradition?

Jam on, everyone!

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